Tablescaping with Books & Kitteh

You will need:

one pile of books

one kitteh.


Artfully arrange both on the dining table. Like this:


Try different angles.


With kitteh looking left …


… looking right …


… looking embarrassed.


(Do we have to continue with this? asks the kitteh. I feel a little bit stupid. – Yes, I say. – Ah, well, says the kitteh.)


Hmm.


Hmmmmmmm.


Hmmmm hmmmm hmmmmmmmmmmm


Hmm – ooops!

4 thoughts on “Tablescaping with Books & Kitteh

  1. Sandra Schwab

    They are all published by Persephone Books, which “reprints neglected classics by C20th (mostly women) writers”. I’m thinking about offering a undergrad seminar called “Lost Voices: Forgotten Early Twentieth Century Women Writers” next winter. So far, I’ve only read Frances Hodgson Burnett’s “The Making of a Marchioness”, but I also have Ruby Ferguson’s “Lady Rose and Mrs Memmary”, De Stevenson’s “Miss Buncle’s Book” and Juliy Strachey’s “Cheerful Weather for the Wedding”, among others. These are my post-PhD books. 🙂

    Have you had a look at my fabrics post? Which collection do you like best?

  2. Laura Vivanco

    Can I send you my copy of Margery Sharp’s Cluny Brown (1944)? I got it because I read a review of the film of the novel. I’d never heard of it before that, so it’s probably relatively “forgotten.”

    What I didn’t realise, until I went to look up more information about Margery Sharp, was that she was also the author of the Miss Bianca books (Bianca’s a mouse). Disney made a film starring Miss Bianca.

    Another (until recently forgotten) novel is Winifred Watson’s Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day. It came out as a film in 2008 but the book was published in 1938.

    Sorry if I seem a bit fixated on books that have been turned in to films. What you’ve said about showing your students film versions of novels made me think that you like being able to do that, so as to make things more fun for them and perhaps to provide a contrast with the written text.

    Have you had a look at my fabrics post? Which collection do you like best?

    Well, they’re all very pretty but, though I hesitate to say this to you, I’m a bit of a minimalist (and I also don’t really like pink very much). While I can appreciate that the fabrics are pretty, I tend to prefer simpler designs so I don’t think I’d be much help to you in choosing the prettiest fabric.

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