I was a bad girl today

First of all, I taught my students about sex in today’s class. About 19th-century sex, to be exact; about frail, ethereal, angelic women and men who are ruled by their beastly passions. And then we hopped directly to the matter of death, femininity and the aesthetic in the 18th and 19th centuries

I fain would follow love if that could be,
I needs must follow death who calls for me.
Call and I follow, I follow! let me die.

Quite chilling, if you ask me. (Apparently, my duckies thought the same: they made lots of shocked noises.) (Which, naturally, made me totally happy and as a result I tried to tell them even more sensationalist stories. *g* Now I fully understand these folklore professors who relish in telling their students about Roman fishsoup or about the use of worms in folk medicine.) And after the lesson one of my students even came to me to say how much he enjoyed today’s lesson. Yay! Of course, this only shows once again that sex sells. (Perhaps I should start thinking about incorporating naked male torsi in my lessons — after all, these sell extremly well, too. *ggg*)

After work, lunch, book-hunting in the library and a few chats, I drove away and bought a) a new anti-virus programme, b) a few Christmas presents, and c) a new workout DVD (Sensual Fighting — sounds good, er?). And when I came home, I cuddled the kitties, took out the garbage, made tea (new tea, didn’t taste nice), plopped down on couch, and watched TV.

So what’s wrong with this picture?

Ah yes, I didn’t do any writing today. After sitting in front of my ‘puter until 12:30 a.m. yesterday, I just didn’t feel strong enough to face the stupid thing again today. Duh. :-/

5 thoughts on “I was a bad girl today

  1. Anonymous

    Excellent! Now you know the feeling of power I get when I start launching into detailed explanations of the exact process by which a person dies when they’re being burnt at the stake!

    Having said that, I wish I could have been at your class and am wondering what poem that quote is from – I love all things Victorian and death-y!

  2. Sandy

    Now you know the feeling of power I get when I start launching into detailed explanations of the exact process by which a person dies when they’re being burnt at the stake!

    Uh-oh. Though, to be honest, I’d rather hear about Roman fishsoup and worm in folk medicine than about burning people (definitely too gruesome!). I guess that’s one of the things that I really put me off historical novels: too much details about torture and what not.

    Having said that, I wish I could have been at your class and am wondering what poem that quote is from – I love all things Victorian and death-y!

    It’s from Tennyson’s “Lancelot & Elaine”. Do you know Anne of Green Gables? — Stupid question, you’re Canadian and thus bound to know Anne of Green Gables. “Lancelot and Elaine” is the poem the girls act out with Anne being Elaine, gliding down the river in a boat — which sadly has a leak. So our Elaine ends up clinging to a bridge and looking like a drowned rat. *g*

  3. Anonymous

    I do indeed know that scene – I’ve just never managed to figure out what poem that was! Mystery solved, eh?

  4. Sandy

    Oh yes, I was just coming to that: they play Elaine, the Lily Maid of Astolat, but in the film Anne recites “The Lady of Shalott” as she floats down the river in her boat. Somebody didn’t do proper research!

Comments are closed.